Software Development Models

Software Development Models

March 18, 2017, Author: Taylor

Some of the different standardized models that developers use when developing new software are:  

Model  Description  
Ad-hoc  Ad-hoc development is usually chaotic in nature. It is when the most qualified developers are given a project without a consistent team, funding, or schedule. The outcome of the product lies solely in the hands of the developer, rather than an organization. Ad-hoc should be a last alternative when choosing a development method.  
Waterfall planning  The waterfall planning model is sequential in its layout. Each phase contains a series of instructions that must be executed and documented before the next phase can begin. This is the most commonly used model, though it may not always be optimal for large and complex projects.  
Structured programming  Structured programming development is a method used by programmers that allows for optimal control over coherence, security, accuracy, and comprehensibility. It uses layering, modularity, and segmenting in its method and usually requires processes to be defined and each sequence or phase to be reviewed. This is one of the most widely-used development models.  
Prototype  The prototype model is a type of iterative development that was made to combat the weaknesses of waterfall-based models. In the prototype model, a small segment of the code is prototyped, then tested and refined using four steps:   Definition of initial concept.  Implementation of initial prototype.  Refinement of prototype until functional.  Complete and release the final version.  
Object-oriented programming  Object-oriented programming is based on the organization of objects rather than actions. It uses pre-assembled programming code in a self-contained module that encapsulates a segment of data and its processing instructions. A block of programming code can be used in any number of different programs once it is written. This method of development has been considered to be a concept that revolutionized computer program development.  
Spiral  The spiral model is a mix of the waterfall model and the prototype model in which a prototype is developed and tested using the waterfall method. Considerations for improvements are implemented from the center outward, hence its name. Additionally, the spiral method includes risk assessment. During the risk assessment, an evaluation is made as to whether the development should continue its production.  
Clean room  The clean room model is used for the development of high-quality software. All levels of development are tested for bugs and defects with the goal of finding problems before they can mature. The goal of the clean room method is that the application will be bug-free at the time of release.  
Extreme programming  The extreme programming model values simplicity, feedback, courage, and communication. It simplifies planning to bring the entire team of developers, managers, and customers together so that adequate feedback and evaluations can be provided. This model usually works quickly, but the end product tends to be fragmented.  
Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE)  Computer-aided software engineering is a method of using computers to help with the systematic analysis, development, design, and implementation of software. It has grown to include visual programming and object-oriented programming. This facilitates the overall security and development of applications and is best for complex, large-scale projects.  

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